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3 Tips to Simplify Photo Composition

The right composition is one of the most important factors when it comes to taking a great photograph. Regardless of how expensive your camera is, without knowing the ins and outs of composition, you probably won’t capture the essence of the image that you see. Worse, someone with less expensive equipment and a good eye, someone who knows about composition, will most likely produce the best photos.

So, what can you do to shoot awesome photos with eye-catching compositions? Below are three tips to simplify composition so you can take professional looking, engaging photos without breaking the bank or spending hours on one shot.

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Fill the Frame

One of the most common mistakes a photographer can make is not filling the frame with their subject when they want to emphasize it. Move in closer and remove the parts that you don’t want, or need, in the image.

This isn’t just for macro photography. You can fill the frame for a nice, tight portrait too. Tight shots are powerful ones.

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Of course, open space is impractical when the object is too small or cannot be identified. When looking at an image, the viewer should be able to clearly identify the subject. But, even if you’re close enough to clearly see the subject, you can still go one further by bringing it in even closer. Pay attention to and give your subject the attention it deserves by filling the frame.

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Look for Dramatic Contrasts, but Keep the Composition Simple

The scale of difference between white and black in a photo is what is referred to as contrast. Dramatic contrasts can add interest and emotion to your photos, as long as you keep the frame tight and focus only on that contrast. Mastering contrast requires you to adjust how you look at the world. You can become more adept at this by trying to see every scene when your camera sees it in terms of color, glare, shadows and all the tones between them.

An image with high contrast will show a full range of tones from black to white, with dark shadows and bright highlights. High contrast images appear sharp and really distinguish the subject from the background.

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On the other hand, an image with low contrast will not show much difference between its lights and darks, and as a result, may seem flat or boring. This lack of distinction between light and dark will also give you subdued colors.

Use high contrast for scenes with more drama and lower contrast for those that you want to look soothing or relaxing. But, don’t overdo it – if you’re going for high contrast, stick to minimal hues in the frame; too many will not give the composition the drama you’re looking for.

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Filling your frame with strong, contrasting colors will definitely give you a strong final image. Again, remember to look for just a couple contrasting colors to really create a powerful composition, as adding in too many hues will weaken the effect. You have to look for colors and textures that work well together. Contrast can be controlled during post processing with the help of photo editing software like Fotor’s high-contrast filters.

Find Natural Frames

Using natural framing can add more meaning and focus to your subject. Examples of natural framing can be bushes, windows, trees or even a doorway. Shoot your subject with the natural frame outlining it to draw the viewer’s eye in.

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But remember, when using natural frames; be sure to focus on the main subject, not on the environment that frames it.

Conclusion

A really great, impactful photo is all about the composition. That’s the point. Strong composition draws a line between a photo taken as just a snapshot and one that is considered a work of art. By following the above three tips, you can create easy compositions that look and feel professional, and really make you stand out as a cutting-edge photographer.

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Daisy3 Tips to Simplify Photo Composition

4 Comments on “3 Tips to Simplify Photo Composition”

  1. Margaret Hayward

    Do you print off the cards so I can send them through the post. if so, what is the cost for my own photo printed on cards so that I can post them out.
    Many thanks for your help,
    Margaret Hayward

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